Target Selling Illegal Products That Put Your Life In Danger

 

 

 

 

targetMajor retailers across the country are ripping people off as we speak and putting lives at risk. We trust these companies to provide quality products, but they aren’t doing that.

Target, Walgreens, GNC and Walmart have been selling their generic herbal supplements that are supposed to rival the name brand supplements, such as Nature Made, but according to New York’s Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman that isn’t even close to true. About 79% of the supplements contained NO trace of what was on the product label.

NO TRACE? Not only is that false advertising, but just plain dangerous.

“This investigation makes one thing abundantly clear: the old adage ‘buyer beware’ may be especially true for consumers of herbal supplements,” Schneiderman said. “The DNA test results seem to confirm long-standing questions about the herbal supplement industry. Mislabeling, contamination, and false advertising are illegal.”

Schneiderman has since sent letters to the above mentioned store to discontinue sales of their supplements which include St. John’s Wort and ginseng.

“Contamination, substitution and falsely labeling herbal products constitute deceptive business practices and, more importantly, present considerable health risks for consumers,” said the letters.

The FDA does regulate herbal supplements, but not the same as it does drugs. The supplements are very unregulated. Manufactures do not have to get FDA approval before putting them in stores. The FDA has recalled supplements in the past.

If they aren’t selling what is on the label, what are they selling us?

Here are the list of findings by retailer that Schneiderman found:

GNC: Six “Herbal Plus” brand herbal supplements per store were purchased and analyzed: gingko biloba, St. John’s wort, ginseng, garlic, echinacea and saw palmetto.

Only one supplement consistently tested for its labeled contents: garlic. One bottle of Saw Palmetto tested positive for containing DNA from the saw palmetto plant, while three others didn’t. The remaining four supplement types yielded mixed results, but none revealed DNA from the labeled herb.

Of 120 DNA tests run on 24 bottles of the herbal products purchased, DNA matched label identification 22% of the time.

Contaminants identified included asparagus, rice, primrose, alfalfa/clover, spruce, ranuncula, houseplant, allium, legume, saw palmetto and echinacea.

Target: Six “Up & Up” brand herbal supplements per store were purchased and analyzed: gingko biloba, St. John’s wort, valerian root, garlic, echinacea and saw palmetto.

Three supplements showed nearly consistent presence of the labeled contents: echinacea (with one sample identifying rice), garlic and saw palmetto. The remaining three supplements showed no DNA from the labeled herb.

Of 90 DNA tests run on 18 bottles of the herbal products purchased, DNA matched label identification 41% of the time.

Contaminants identified included allium, French bean, asparagus, pea, wild carrot and saw palmetto.

Walgreens: Six “Finest Nutrition” brand herbal supplements per store were purchased and analyzed: gingko biloba, St. John’s wort, ginseng, garlic, echinacea and saw palmetto.

Only one supplement consistently tested for its labeled contents: saw palmetto. The remaining five supplements yielded mixed results, with one sample of garlic showing appropriate DNA. The other bottles yielded no DNA from the labeled herb.

Of the 90 DNA test run on 18 bottles of herbal products purchased, DNA matched label representation 18% of the time.

Contaminants identified included allium, rice, wheat, palm, daisy and dracaena (houseplant).

Walmart: Six “Spring Valley” brand herbal supplements per store were purchased and analyzed: gingko biloba, St. John’s wort, ginseng, garlic, echinacea and saw palmetto.

None of the supplements tested consistently revealed DNA from the labeled herb. One bottle of garlic had a minimal showing of garlic DNA, as did one bottle of saw palmetto. All remaining bottles failed to produce DNA verifying the labeled herb.

Of the 90 DNA test run on 18 bottles of herbal products purchased, DNA matched label representation 4% of the time.

Contaminants identified included allium, pine, wheat/grass, rice mustard, citrus, dracaena (houseplant) and cassava (tropical tree root).

Wal-Mart was the biggest offender with all 6 products failing the testing.

Walgreen’s stated that all of their stores nation-wide will be pulling the offending products, while Wal-Mart and GNC said that they’d handle it “appropriately.” Target refused to respond at all.

“Consumers already had ample reason to doubt most of the claims made by herbal supplement manufacturers, who have precious little scientific evidence indicating these herbs’ effectiveness in the first place,” said David Schardt, senior nutritionist at the Center for Science in the Public Interest. “But when the advertised herbs aren’t even in many of the pills, it’s a sign that this poorly regulated industry is in desperate need of reform. Until then, and perhaps even after then, consumers should stop wasting their money in the herbal supplements aisle.”

After all of this, would you still buy generic supplements from these retailers, let alone supplements at all?