Latest Creature To Get The Blame For Methane Leading To Climate Change

building-the-dam

In the fantastical world of global warming, global cooling, climate change, climate disruption – whatever the catchphrase is this week – it’s always some animal on earth’s fault.  Humans burn stuff thus creating carbon (a basic element) that is supposed to have some sort of climate changing effect.  Cows which are used as a major food source for humans flatulate and create methane, which supposedly traps heat near the surface of the planet.

Now climate “scientists” are pointing out that shallow pools that trap rotting vegetation also contribute to the methane issue.  There are plenty of these pools that appear naturally, but the latest bullseye laid by the environmental crowd is not on Mother Nature, but one of her critters.  The busily industrious and apparently very bad beaver.  (This might be the first time Phil Robertson and environmentalists have agreed on anything.)

It seems that in the push to bring the beaver back from the brink of extinction after the beaver fur craze of yesteryear (that made parts of the American midwest REALLY profitable and why half the cities out here actually exist), the beavers have been busy not just building lodges, but being sure that the species thrives.

After trapping was limited and the creatures were reintroduced to their natural ranges, their numbers grew significantly, with scientists now estimating their population to have reached over 10 million worldwide.

Well, that’s what happens when God’s creatures are left alone to procreate without their primary predators picking them off.  And the problem for the global warming crowd?

However, the consequence of this has led to beavers building more ponds, creating conditions for climate changing methane gas to be generated in the shallow standing water. Beavers build dams in rivers to create standing ponds, with dams normally reaching no higher than 1.5m.

In their work published in the Springer journal AMBIO, experts note that carbon builds up in oxygen-poor pond bottoms like those created by beavers, and methane is generated. The gas cannot be dissolved and is released into the atmosphere.

Researchers at the University of Saskatchewan in Canada have found this methane release from beaver ponds is now 200 times higher than it was a century ago.

Well, yeah, there’s a lot more beavers since humans no longer wear their pelts.  (Honestly, what are these people experts on?)  The real question that is not answered in the International Business Times piece quoted above is what was the methane range from beavers, and the rest of God’s creatures, BEFORE beavers were hunted mercilessly for their fur, when the American wilderness was yet to be fully explored and settled.  It could well be that we are returning to natural methane levels from this animal.

And yes, the writer of the article still blamed humans for the majority of methane production.

About the Author

Cultural Limits
A resident of Flyover Country, Cultural Limits is a rare creature in American Conservatism - committed to not just small government, Christianity and traditional social roles, but non-profits and high arts and culture. Watching politics, observing human behavior and writing are all long-time interests. In her other life, CL writes romance novels under her nom de plume, Patricia Holden (@PatriciaHoldenAuthor on Facebook), and crochets like a mad woman (designs can be found on Facebook @BohemianFlairCrochet and on Pinterest on the Bohemian Flair Crochet board). In religion, CL is Catholic; in work, the jill of all trades when it comes to fundraising software manipulation and event planning; in play, a classically trained soprano and proud citizen of Cardinal Nation, although, during hockey season, Bleeds Blue. She lives in the Mid-Mississippi River Valley with family and two cute and charming tyrants...make that toy dogs.